General Questions

Extremely unlikely! It is normal for your milk production to change to meet your baby's needs, and for you to no longer feel "full" between feedings. As long as your baby continues to grow and gain weight appropriately, and is satisfied when he comes off the breast, then there is probably no need to worry. However, if you are still concerned, contact your local Leader for a more personalized discussion.

In the early days, when the baby is getting colostrum, many mothers don't hear swallows. This doesn't mean that your baby is not getting milk. Often you will be able to see swallows as your baby's jaw drops closer down to his chest for an instant. It is this drop in the chin that tells you that colostrum is going into his mouth; it may look like his suck is deeper and longer. Often babies then rest for a couple of seconds before continuing a pattern of little sucks-dropped jaw-pause.

Human milk is designed with all the nutrients in the right proportions for human babies. Mothers all over the world, eating many types of foods, have similar nutrients in their milk. If a mother is very malnourished her milk can have low amounts of some nutrients, but this is extemely rare in Canada.

Initially babies lose weight. This is mainly because they are expelling the black tarry stool (meconium) that has built up inside the colon during pregnancy. After the meconium is flushed out, the baby's weight will stabilize and the baby begins to gain weight. This most often happens after the third or fourth day. Many babies lose about 7-8% before they start gaining. A baby is expected to return to his birth weight by 10-14 days of age.

Allowing your baby to suckle often and long enough to remove milk are the best ways to establish a good milk supply. Helping your baby obtain a deep mouthful of breast is also important. For more detailed information: Information Sheet #469: Establishing Your Milk Supply  or contact a local Leader.

Colostrum is the 'first milk' produced by your breasts, starting during pregnancy. It is a concentrated form of "mature milk", which is very high in protein, antibodies and other protective components that are important for your newborn. It is thicker than mature milk and often has a yellowish colour to it. It is produced in small amounts (10-100 mL/24 hours), which is perfect for your newborn's tiny tummy. The smaller volumes also give your baby a chance to learn to nurse without being overwhelmed by a large flow of milk in the first few days.